Workshop on TRANSFORM-AUTOMATE-GROW

Workshop on TRANSFORM-AUTOMATE-GROW

SpadeWorx organised and delivered a workshop on ‘Transform, Automate and Grow’ in Partnership with Microsoft India on 25th January at Microsoft Office in Mumbai, India. . It was a half-day workshop attended by CIO’s and the heads of technology from various companies. One of India’s largest pharmaceutical company, a financial and insurance major, a behemoth in paint industry as well as a giant machine industry representative took part in this workshop. The storyline of this interactive workshop was how companies today are transforming themselves with the use of innovative technologies, how they are automating business processes with the use of robotic and intelligent automation tools which in turn results in exponential growth. The session was also backed by Microsoft in terms of how Azure is helping them achieve said objective. Furthermore showcased were the different avenues of application development and cloud enablement services being offered by Microsoft. It was an interesting session wherein various cases were shared by participating companies and opinions were exchanged on how they would want technology to enable their business processes. SpadeWorx looks forward to hosting such sessions in the near future at various locations!
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How bots help automation using MS Cognitive Services Framework

How bots help automation using MS Cognitive Services Framework

In this fast-paced world that is almost entirely technologically dependent; artificial intelligence is rapidly becoming a part of our everyday lives. Know what artificial intelligence bots are!

For long, artificial intelligence has remained a vague idea, one which people weren’t able to fully comprehend.

Well, it is quite simple actually! In layman’s terms artificial intelligence can be termed as the ability to infuse human abilities of decision making or speech recognition into technology. It simply means making technology as intelligent as us, so as to make life easier and less time-consuming. Take for example the widely popular personal assistant applications on your phone. From daily appointment reminders to helping you locate the nearest pet store, these applications do it all. This basic form of artificial intelligence is something that makes your every errand quicker and easier.

Artificial intelligence bots (robots) are similar, but labour at a much larger scale than mere personal assistant applications. MS Cognitive Services is basically a framework that integrates intellectual and life-like qualities of vision, speech, language and knowledge into A.I bots that help make processes within a company fully automated. MS Cognitive Services use tools such as cognitive thinking, natural language processing and machine learning within A.I bots to help automate. Cognitive thinking is the ability to soak in information, interpret it in an appropriate manner and perceive or react to the learned information suitably. Just like a human being, A.I bots are able to do this! Usually, computers need to have information fed into them in a systematic and organized manner and in a specific language that needs to remain unchanged. Natural language processing is the ability of an A.I bot to interpret and analyze a person’s natural language and speech thus diminishing the effort of making use of Java, C or other programs and use only basic human language to function. Machine learning is the ability of a computer to deal with interpretation of data unsupervised. It is the computer’s ability to evolve and make intelligent decisions on its own. All of these abilities are infused into a bot making it intelligent and giving it the power to make calculated decisions.

Collaborating with Microsoft Cognitive Services, SpadeWorx develops artificial intelligence bots that can be used on a large scale in the corporate world. Our company creates user-centric customized bots that are unique in its utility. These bots are crafted to essentially manage, curate and simplify processes that are time consuming and fraught with inefficiency. For example, SpadeWorx recently created the Leave Manager Bot which helps employees and managers to redefine the way the leave request, approval and management processes are carried out. The employees can apply for their leave using the customized bot, are able to check for holidays that are available, can send approval notifications or pose questions. For managers or those in charge of the approval process, the A.I bot can present previous leave approved timelines, pending requests, various colleagues in the department who are on leave, calendars, etc. This easy mode of conversation that is systematic and practical, cuts to the chase and makes the entire process simpler than if done manually. Apart from the Leave Manager Bot SpadeWorx prides itself on creating various other artificial intelligence bots and programs to make work more productive and energy-efficient.
The future is NOW with SpadeWorx.
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The first rule of chatbots: Don’t lie to your users An interview with UX designer Joe Toscano

Chatbot

By Vishal Gangawane

Chatbots were all the rage in 2016 and 2017 promises to be no different. We spoke to Joe Toscano, an user experience design professional based in San Fransisco, about the current and future impact of chatbots. Toscano manages and lead experience design and prototyping for R/GA’s team embedded at Google. R/GA is a full service digital agency creating products, services and communications to help grow our client’s businesses in the connected age. He also blogs on the Invision blog and at Muzli.
Q. As a primer, could you tell us in brief about chatbots? Also, are chatbots truly the next big thing and if true what industries is this likely to disrupt?
Chatbots, for those that are unaware, are software programs created to replicate human conversation with human users.
The concept of chatbots has been around for several decades. Since the 1950s, to be exact. The beginnings can be traced back to Alan Turing, and his experiments with computer science and human intelligence. These would later form the basis for what we refer to as the Turing test.
Creating a true “chat” bot is very difficult. It requires a lot of data and a lot of iteration.
I believe chatbots as most people understand them are a trend at this moment in history. I think right now we’re going to see a lot of companies trying to own the space and create the best bot possible. And I think for that reason chatbots are going to disrupt a lot of industries.
But I think once our natural language processing systems have enough data running through them and we can speak to these bots, the bubble will pop. I think the modern chatbot manifested in a text messaging app will be around for a while, maybe 3-5 years, but I don’t think it’s the end all product that most bot makers and creative technologists are truly excited about. I think chatbots as we currently understand them are just the onboarding for the future.
Q. You have written about your best practices for building chatbots. Could you repeat them for our readers again in brief here?
1.Don’t lie to your users: I think this is important for any brand/product. But it’s especially important with chatbots. Humans are much less likely to trust a computer agent than another human. And if you blow it once, you’re probably not going to get a second or third chance.
2. Onboard with conversation: The general public isn’t used to interacting with and commanding their devices. Help them learn by initiating the conversation. Don’t create a tutorial, but ask them questions or give them commands about how to use your bot.
3. Design for human emotion: Similar to point 1, your bot is not inherently attractive to human users. We, as humans, crave human connection. It’s important that your bot meets your user as a human. But don’t try to trick your users into believing it is a human. It’s a fine line.
4. Conversation is limitless: Language is an incredible tool. It’s the closest tool we have to mind alteration. We can speak and communicate ideas from one head to the other with relatively simple ease. But teaching a computer to understand language like we do is not easy.
5. Create boundaries: We’re better off creating specific conversations and directing the flow of the conversation to keep people within the ‘loop’ we’ve created. It will not only help make sure your bot doesn’t break, but also make sure that your users are having the best experience possible.
6. Let them down easy: When your bot does fail, make sure you’ve created a plan to help keep people around. If your screen goes blank or you give them some painful error message, your users are just going to leave and probably not come back again.
7. Every interaction is meaningful: Unlike the web and apps where many interactions are required just to navigate the page, every interaction with your bot will give an output. Every interaction becomes meaningful.
8. Help users help you: You’ll never know everything your users want. That goes for any product. But bots make it easier to figure it out. All you have to do is ask. Or offer a spot for your users to submit things. Let your users shape the product by telling you what they want.
9. Identify and target user sentiment: As we’ve already recognized, human emotion is as important in bots as anywhere else on the web. Maybe more important. And it’s the first platform where we’re getting insights into human emotions through contextual conversation. We can use this to teach our bot to recognize the emotions and help create a better experience.
Q. Say five to ten years down the line, how do you envision chatbots transforming the lives of users?
Humans are very habitual creatures. Sure, not every day is exactly the same, but there are a lot of similarities across days. I believe the knowledge we get from bots will allow us to build systems that anticipate our needs and get us away from our screens. I believe eventually bots will become an extension of our self.
Right now we do this through sites and apps that automate things for us — Reminder apps to keep us on track, apps like Instacart to do our grocery shopping, apps like Uber to get us a ride from place to place.
I believe eventually we won’t have to pull our phones out of our pocket but we’ll be able to make all these things happen.
Q. In the same vein, how will the role of UX designers change in about the same period?
I believe the role of UX designer will stay relatively the same — create systems that meet your users needs in the most intuitive way. But I believe the needs of users will change, and that’s the difference.
That’s just a historical fact though. If we stayed the same, society would never move forward. I just think we’re going to start moving forward at exponential rates. I’d argue we already have in many parts of the world, but I believe it’s going to be global instead of just in pockets of the world like San Francisco, New York, South Korea, etc.
Q. Aren’t chatbots essentially a technical project? Will UX designers have a role to play beyond providing the script/dialogue of how the conversations will play out?
Similar to the last question, I believe UX designers will always have a role — understanding and empathizing with the humans using the product. I believe this will be one of the last roles to be phased out of technical projects, because human emotion is so hard to replicate in binaries.
Q. How will chatbots affect enterprise software? India’s software industry primarily caters to large enterprise clients overseas so we are extremely interested in seeing how this plays out.
I don’t have specific examples off the top of my head but any way that systems can be automated and made more efficient, an enterprise is going to love it. And I know that’s a fact.
Q. Will the emergence of chatbots mean lesser investments in building web, mobile applications by enterprises? Or will chatbots play a more complimentary role with what gets built?
I think initially you’re going to see businesses trying to build chatbots within their apps. I think it’s going to be difficult for businesses to commit to the fact that apps are going to be old news, because they’ve invested so much into their ecosystems and it won’t be easy to just toss that stuff out the window. I think that’s part of why it will take so long for bots to become the default.
But I believe eventually bots (i.e. Google Assistant, Siri, Alexa, etc.) will become the next telecom. I believe there will be a few that hold the market and people will use them based on what their algorithms produce.
Data is the new oil and building the best AI system is the new race to space.
Q. Which companies/startups/people are the ones to watch out in the chatbots arena?
In terms of complex, data driven bots used for search and information/navigating the world around us:
• Google → Google Assistant
• Amazon → Alexa
• Apple → Siri
• SoundHound → Hound
In terms of focused bots performing specific tasks that do it really well right now:
• Pana
• Hipmunk
• Duolingo
• Penny
Q. What are likely to be the hurdles and roadblocks before we see mainstream adoption of chatbots?
I believe the biggest hurdle will be user adoption and I believe the biggest roadblock to that will be making sure bots do not turn into spam messaging bots, because bots already have a stigma of being spam and if we want people to adopt these systems, we’re going to need to turn that around.
Also, privacy. Making sure people know what their data is being used for and how they can control where their data is going.
This is a very important chapter in my book, actually.
Q. And finally, is the hype true? Will chatbots kill apps?
Yes, I believe the hype is true. I think it’s still going to take 2-3 years before we have a revolutionary breakthrough that makes these technologies accessible to everyone, and I believe it will take 3-5 before bots become adopted by the mainstream, but I believe automated systems that are backed by artificial intelligence and are interacted with through voice/text will kill off apps eventually.
If you want to know more about chatbots, Toscano in the process of writing a book that explains all these points and much more. It is likely to be done by mid-February 2017. You can sign up to join over 700 people that are already on the waitlist here: http://bit.ly/2eELh9W
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SpadeWorx Celebrated its 10th Anniversary- 29 Dec, 2016

SpadeWorx Celebrated its 10th Anniversary
SpadeWorx Celebrated its 10th Anniversary, 29 Dec, 2016
SpadeWorx celebrated its 10th Anniversary in Grand Style last Evening with amazing performances, lots of fun and cheer, Awards and of course a sumptuous dinner.
For last couple of weeks Employees were really enthusiastic about the annual day and in spite of work load ,they managed to find time to practice their individual and group performances for the evening.
With a quick rap of events happened in last one year at SpadeWorx, the evening started with glitter and shine at the venue with Ganesh Vandana act performed by Prachi.
This annual day celebration were not just about Awards and Appreciation but Talent Show by Employees spread over 3 hours in the evening. Some very interesting performances were put up by employees in terms of Skit, Fashion show, Group performances and Singing. To top it all our directors Mandar and Jitendra shook a leg with their better halves and surprised us all with their well-coordinated moves.
Different categories of Awards were lined up and to keep the surprise notion up nominations were announced first in the middle of various acts.
Our teams from Onsite places such as US and Bangalore joined for this event and watched the live streaming of performances and participated in their capacity.
Final awards were given to deserving candidates from the nominations with loud cheers. Hearty Congratulations to all.
All in all this was a well celebrated event which augurs well for the future of SpadeWorx. All the best to all Employees for putting the best foot forward for this Annual day celebrations and here is wishing a very Happy Year 2017.
Au revoir.
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Open House December 2016

Open House December 2016
OpenHouse-December_2016.jpg
Open House December 2016
Winter has set in but its effect has been offsetted by warmth exuded by people in Open House.This was bolstered more when our newly inducted colleagues introduced themselves amidst laughter and anecdotes.
Our Director and CTO, Mandar Bhagwat briefed employees about current business development activities.He also urged people to take help with resources available in the company, be it -Online or Printed to increase their knowledge and intellect in new areas, technologies.
Design and Mobile teams were mentioned for their notable work which has been appreciated often by customers.
Mandar broke the news about his impeding address at ICDL 2016 -Smart Future Event.
ICDL 2016 is an event being organised by TERI (The Energy and Resources Institute, www.teriin.org) between 13th-16th December at IHC ,Delhi, India on “knowledge Trends that will change the World”. Mandar will be delivering his address on “Knowledge Management for Millenials” at this ocassion which will be streamed live in several countries.
Jitendra Wase, Director and COO addressed employees and guided on policies and offered to help incase of any suggestion being presented.
This time a new initiative called “INSIDE OUT” was rolled out in “Open House” . A “Skit” was presented lead by Maya,Ashwini,Sanchari and team wherein they enacted on a situation of “Event Planning”. Audience comments/observation were taken from their perspective of relating it to real life/work environment. This was fun and gave insights about how people think,perceive and relate to situations around.
A round of applause for the team for coming out with something creative and fresh. We will see more of it in coming months.
Aarti Pitekar was chosen as Star of the month award for her work in the project, clarity of thought and mature handiling of customer-Quite commendable being a rank newcomer.
We are already in last month of the year but looking at the progress we are making holistically, it augurs well for the future.Way to go guys !!
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For intranet projects, search for ways to include unexpected delight for users

BY Prafull Mane

Jennifer Aldrich is a UX & Content Strategist at InVision, the popular prototyping, collaboration, and workflow platform. Aldrich’s interests are varied and include content strategy, design thinking, user centered design, writing, defining product voice and tone, usability testing and user research. She firmly believes that sharing knowledge is one of the most powerful ways that members of the UX community can make an impact on the world around them.
Aldrich spoke to Spadeworx about her UX prep, user research, convincing stakeholders to invest in the UX process, design thinking and how the path to being a UX professional can often be circuitous.
Q. How do you approach a project? What is your preparation process you follow before starting any project?
I honestly consider prep work part of my process. Including prep in your design time estimates and allotments will save you frustration and headaches down the line. Research is a huge first step. Chat with your target audience and deep dive to find out not just what they want, but what the underlying problems are that they’re trying to solve. If you’re creating a brand new product, don’t get hung up on what competitors offer, focus on what clients actually need. Often times competitors, especially those that have been around for a long time, get bogged down by legacy features that aren’t even useful anymore. You don’t want to do a competitive analysis and wind up working on features that are already useless. Focusing on specific problems that aren’t being addressed well currently can make your product lighter weight, easier to use and position you as a real contender in your space.
Q. It’s often hard to convince stakeholders to invest in the UX process. How do you make them see the value of good UX?
The key to getting a company to invest in the UX process if you’re working in-house or at an agency, is finding a high ranking internal sponsor. Bobby Meeks just did a great webinar with Designer Hangout that focused a lot on the topic. Don’t try to change the entire organization yourself, find a person at the top who will help advocate and evangelize the concept company wide. Once you have that buy in, other stakeholders tend to jump on board. When working with individual clients, sell the financial value. Explain that spending some time doing some user research and usability testing can save them huge amounts of money that would otherwise go to redesign. Saving cash is a big motivator for stakeholders and clients.
Q. Intranet sites often don’t get enough love when it comes to user experience. How can we make intranet sites more interesting and not just something that employees use just because they no option?
Getting a high ranking team member to sponsor it as a way to improve work culture can really help. As far as how to make them more interesting, treat them the way you would your product. Do some user research to figure out where pain points are, improve the UX, search for ways to include unexpected delight, focus on adding some content that would be interesting to internal staff members (perhaps a series of interviews about team members) etc.
Q. In terms of the UX process, how can applying the Pareto principle be useful?
Absolutely. Applying the Pareto Principle to your user research strategy can be especially beneficial. I’ve outlined a method that I used at my last startup here: https://uxmag.com/articles/pareto-principle-based-user-research
Q. What are your ways of finding pain points in any product?
To find pain points there are really 3 main discovery tools. The first is conducting user research. Get out and talk to your clients, walk them through various scenarios, ask them direct what is causing them the most pain. Next is reviewing support cases. Chatting with your support team, and analyzing case data can help you quickly identify areas of the product that need to be improved most. Thirdly, trying to use the product yourself on a daily basis can be extremely helpful in IDing major product issues. Even if the tool isn’t something that would be traditionally related to your role, learning to use it, and attempting to use it at least once a day to finish a primary task can be very eye opening. It’s one thing to hear about other people experiencing an issue, it’s another thing entirely to actually experience it yourself. It’s a very powerful motivator.
Q. Design Thinking is getting a lot of attention in recent times. Could you tell us your views on how it can be applied to various problems?
Design thinking is creating a cultural shift across organizations. In the past, design teams were siloed off within organizations. Companies are now realizing that the skills that designers use to think through and solve problems can be applied cross functionally, and as a result design has made its way to C level roles in businesses all over the world. Designers are being called on to apply their skillets to all kinds of business problems.
Q. Any tips for UX designers on how they can start thinking about sustainability more and bringing that more into their work?
Sustainability is so, so important. I’ll never forget the first time I watched Objectified. The scene that showed mountains of old tech in a landfill was burned into my mind and has stuck with me ever since. There are several areas that we tend to overlook, not intentionally, they just aren’t front of mind, in design. Focusing on sustainability is one, as is accessibility. As far as bringing it into our work, it really just requires a shift in thinking. If someone needs some convincing about designing with sustainability in mind, I’d definitely recommend having them watch the landfill scene from objectified. It’s pretty haunting.
Q. Could you tell us about how you made your way into User Experience? You have a science and psychology degree. How did that guide your work?
I took a circuitous route into the UX industry. I built my first website in the 90s and had a blast doing it. At that point it didn’t occur to me that design was something I could turn into a career, so I wound up heading to college and getting a degree in education and another in psychology. While I was finishing up my second degree, I took on a part-time job as a computer lab tech. I got to witness first hand the impact that well executed software has on the workflows and levels of productivity of members of various industries. I also got to witness the impact of poorly designed software—the loss of time and energy and high levels of frustration that it could inflict. After graduation, I wound up taking a job at a startup as a software trainer, but was eventually loaned out to the design and development department during a product overhaul project (rebuilding our entire platform on .NET). That was when I truly fell in love with product design. I was offered a job on the UX team soon after the project was completed, and had amazing mentors that helped me grow and launch my career. Pulling from a background in psychology has definitely impacted the way I perform user research and usability testing. I find the entire process and the results fascinating.
Q. We are huge InVision fans and very curious about how things work there. Could you tell us about the design process at InVision and the culture in general?
The culture here at InVision is phenomenal. We have clearer lines of communication than I’ve ever experienced in a traditional office setting and a very positive overall culture. There is much respect across teams, the leadership team is phenomenal and teams work together beautifully cross departmentally. We even have a peer recognition program that gets used very heavily each month. The employees at InVision are just fantastic.
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If more and more things became smart, we’d run out of space on our phones to install all of the apps

Scott Jenson

If more and more things became smart, we’d run out of space on our phones to install all of the apps

By Vishal Gangawane

Intro: Scott Jenson is the prime mover behind the Physical Web project at Google. The Physical Web’s ambitious aim is to create an “open approach to enable quick and seamless interactions with physical objects and locations.
Jenson is an UX expert from the time before UX as a term became commonplace. He has worked for over 25 years in the field of user interface and has worked with Apple, Symbian, Cognima, Google and Frog Design. His current stint at Google began in 2013 when he returned to the tech major to lead the Physical Web project.
Here he speaks about the Physical Web, future trends in UX, on starting up and is Apple losing its way in recent times.
1. Can you tell us what the Physical Web project is and how did you come up with the idea? How is the Physical Web different from IoT?
I noticed that every “smart device” such as a nest thermostat or a Hue Lightbulb each had their own phone application. It seemed obvious to me we were going to have a problem: if more and more things became smart, we’d run out of space on our phones to install all of the apps.The Physical Web is a user centered approach to technology, starting with the basic premise: walk into any place or in front of any device and to be able to interact with it quickly and easily.The super power of the web is interaction on demand, you can view any page in a few seconds (if done well) The Physical Web is just about making that easy in a mobile context: allowing your phone to perceive the web pages around you and letting you pick one of this with very little effort.
2. Projecting 20 years into the future, how would a typical day in our lives look like with the Physical Web in place?
I expect that much like wifi today, we’ll just expect that things will be annotated with content. Dog collars, public places, car sharing services will all let you interact with them with them easily. However, as the Physical Web becomes more common place, we expect more advances will be made with the scanners. Right now we’re taking a very conservative approach, only showing you things when you ask. Scanners will get more sophisticated finding specialized beacons (such as navigation for blind users) and allow users to interact while walking around a space.
3. You wrote Mobile apps must die back in 2011. That was the high noon of the mobile app ecosystem and your article produced a lot of reactionary response. How have your views about apps and the Physical web evolved since then?
I’ve calmed down a bit) I’m not trying to kill native apps. My point is that native apps are fine, they just aren’t practical for all use cases. Anything that is more light weight and ephemeral is a good candidate for the Physical Web.
4. What are the major barriers to mainstream adoption of the Physical Web currently? The premise seems so perfect – all our phones have browsers, so why add another layer of friction with app . I ask this even as I’m taking into account Gartner’s Hype Cycle.
There is a clear chicken/egg loop here: most deployers don’t want to try it until everyone else does. It will take a little while longer as more and more people try and experiment with it. The more it is used, the more people will be willing to try it.
5. Which company/start-up/group is doing the most promising work in terms of the Physical Web?
There are so many. Lots of beacon makers are trying things like integrating their URL shortener with their beacons. That makes deployment very fast and inexpensive. There are additional content platforms being made and just yesterday, I saw a ‘street musician app’ that turns your phone into a simple beacon that lets people around you know where to find out more about you.
6. The Physical Web project is clearly positioned at consumers. Is there any way enterprises could also use the same tech?
I would assume any company that is building a smart device (consumer or professional) would be interested in this. As we move to other transports beyond BLE (such as wifi-direct and/or mDNS) we expect more industrial use cases will be enabled.
7. Steve Jobs famously resisted allowing third party developers from making apps when the iPhone was launched. In some way, did Jobs see the possibility of the Physical Web back then?
I think we are approaching the issue from 2 very different points of view…
8. I loved your post ‘We need more Communism’. India is (or at least was until recently) in the midst of a start-up boom and the prevailing wisdom has become ‘Start your own thing’. Any words of advice to the young ‘uns here in India in the context of your post?
That post was just pointing out that we’re so encouraged to think shorter term. While I’d love to see big companies/governments invest in longer term technology plays, I also think the shareware/maker movement can literally change the world. Just don’t expect to get rich in the short term… However, anyone who does “make a dent in the universe (as Mr Jobs once said) likely won’t have to worry too much about money.
9. You were an UX specialist even before the term was invented. Tell us about your views on what the future holds for interfaces and experiences for consumers in the future.
That’s a VERY big question: we humans usually use tomorrow’s technology to solve yesterday’s tasks. It takes a while to really understand the impact of a new technology. It’s a rather chaotic system and anyone claiming they know what is going to happen is likely trying to sell you something./p>
10. You just turned your back on Macs after using them for 30 years (I got that from your blog). You have worked with Apple for many years and have seen a lot in terms of tech over the years. Has Apple lost its way post-Steve Jobs’s passing? And if it has, what is the way forward.
I wouldn’t quite say it that strongly. I feel that Apple is focusing on the iPhone and forgetting why creative professionals use laptops in the first place. We don’t want toasters, we need work benches. The latest MacBook Pros are perfectly find consumer level machines, I don’t want to imply they are bad. However, they are not flexible or powerful enough for me. So I’m trying my little experiment. I have to admit that I’m a little nervous. But you usually don’t learn anything important by playing it safe.
Recent Blogs

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An intranet that doesn’t engage will grow stale and unused…  So, design is worth that investment

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How SharePoint is changing: Behind the scenes with Adam Harmetz, Partner GPM on SharePoint and Office 365

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Children’s Day-14 Nov 2016

Children’s Day-14 Nov 2016
Children’s Day-14 Nov 2016
Yesterday Children’s day was celebrated in SpadeWorx which was initiated ,planned and executed by HR Team lead by Neha Vyas.
With a message that “Keep alive the child in You – the Innocence, its curious nature, ever learning attitude, contagious stress free smile, its forgetting & letting off attitude of anger , fights, conflicts… “
Set of Fun activities were planned right from attire wherein Employees came dressed as children and appeared like school going ones. Quite Cool.
Cafeteria became playing ground for all in the evening where in games were played like HOPSCOTCH, Kho-Kho, Blind man’s buff etc. Fun part Our Directors also participated in some of them.
One of the interesting activity planned by HR team featured collection of the childhood photos of employees and identification of them on large screen. This was real Fun.
Basically we all never grow up. We only learn how to act in a public… Happy Children’s Day to all those who have a sparkle of a child in them!!!
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Open House -November 1st Week.

Open House November 2016
Open House November 2016
This was the first open house after diwali vacation and it reflected in the mood of the people sharing their experiences.
SpadeWorx family grew bit more this month with new joiners introducing themselves to colleagues and provided information about their previous work experiences and hobbies with some interesting anecdotes.
At the outset Director and CTO, Mandar Bhagwat briefed employees about current projects, new wins and business development activities. He also provided snippets on some new initiatives such as BlockChain and Cognitive services which are technologies of the future. Something very interesting is happening in this space and may change the way we transact and interact using such technologies.
Jitendra Wase, Director and COO congratulated team for their outstanding deliveries and appreciation received from several clients.
Tushar Sakhare was chosen as star of the month for his contribution on project and other activities.
Monthly Practice of answering of queries and opinions were done through “Voices Box” and some engaging threads came out which were answered categorically.
Diwali, festival of lights gets its true meaning if one lits up light in lives of underprivileged children,keeping this thought in mind, at this time of the year we at SpadeWorx decided to do our bit and contribute to the society.
SpadeWorx donated a significant amount for the noble cause to two NGO’s. “Save the Children” and “Smile Foundation”
Group of Employees also contributed in their individual capacity to Prabodhini Trust, Nashik which works for mentally challenged people.
This was greatly applauded by all.
Let’s keep the good work going. Cheers !!
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Intra SpadeWorx TT Tournament-2016(Finals)

Intra SpadeWorx TT Tournament-2016(Finals)
Intra SpadeWorx TT Tournament-2016(Finals)
This week the double’s matches were played. The matches were very interesting as every spectator was very attentive for every shot. The boys gave the tough fight as every set was very tricky and ended with the deuce. Every set took half an hour to complete. In the finals Sagar& Gaurav won over the Siddesh & Praveen.
In the Women’s doubles Prachi and Pranoti played very well against Dipti and Varsha. Prachi and Pranoti won the game very easily in just 15 mins. Although everyone tried very well.
Finally all the matches of the Tournament are over. In the end there was Prize Distribution ceremony. Vishwa was awarded Winner and Mandar was awarded Runner-up, Trophy and certificate resp. for Men’s Singles. Prachi was awarded Winner and Pranoti was awarded Runner-up, Trophy and Certificate resp. for Women’s Single’s. For doubles’ Sagar & Gaurav were awarded Winner and Siddhesh & Praveen were awarded Runner-up, trophy and Certificate resp. For Women’s doubles’ Prachi & Pranoti were awarded Winner and Dipti & Varsha were awarded Runner-up, trophy and Certificate resp.
This year matches were played technically very well and the players have improved their games. Next year I wish to see more improved games!!
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