An intranet that doesn’t engage will grow stale and unused… So, design is worth that investment

‘An intranet that doesn’t engage will grow stale and unused… So, design is worth that investment’

With the big focus on Intelligent cloud strategy, what is your vision with SharePoint on-premise implementations? what guidance you will provide to customer who continue to invest in SharePoint on-premise?
We’ve announced SharePoint Server 2019, our next on premises release, back at the last Microsoft Ignite conference. This upcoming week, we’ll share more details about the release, so stay tuned!
We are committed to supporting customers through the transition to the cloud, including a new on premises release so the cloud earns the right to be the default choice instead of it being a forced move. Our deep investment in hybrid experiences and well as migration tools from us and partners help bridge this gap.
We think a lot about how we can be a trusted partner to our customers in this generational shift to cloud computing. I think the fact that Microsoft ourselves is going through similar cultural and technological transformation gives us a lot of empathy for the disruption many of our customers are seeing and I personally try to channel that empathy into the product every day. It’s not just about a technological choice but rather an entire relationship you can have with Microsoft to help you through a critical time for your business.
It’s a given that Intranets are important communication vehicles for most organizations. What additional benefits will ‘intelligent’ intranet brings to the table?
Much of what is intelligent is how the intranet becomes more aware of the user who is signed in. It becomes more dynamic as the user moves from site to site, reads news and navigates into and out of libraries and lists. Each experience is aware of who the user is working with and what they are working on – which then begins to present content and people to the user before they have to go hunting for it. This equates to an intranet that works for you, one you visit and rely on more.
You must have experienced and have seen so many Intranet implementations, In your opinion what are the things common amongst the best implemented intranets?
Engaging design that matches thoughtful information architecture are the first two areas that come to mind. Users should want not only to come to an intranet for what they are looking for, but to return as they experience a beautiful site that holds value on a more recurring basis.
Second, it’s needs to be current, both with functionality and the content itself. This can be highly curated, or programmatic based on intranet rules and policies, so people don’t see the same content over and over again, and if something gets out of date – that it is removed or disappears from the users viewpoint.
Could you share your views on how intranets will evolve over the near-long term – say in the 5-10 years. What are the challenges and opportunities that you foresee?
The notion of a more connected intranet will evolve to bring in further sources of information that surround us that can influence and help our day to day. This could be as simple as external news sources, and it could be services and systems that boil complex scenarios and information clashes into meaningful insights based on all your interactions with the world – your social influences, personal surroundings based on location, awareness of sentiment, and more. The challenge is to refine and have the intranet be helpful without loss on nuance of what is important for the individual.
SharePoint Hub Sites is brand new and is generating a lot of buzz. What are the major strengths of Hub SItes? How do you expect communication and collaboration to change in organisations with the introduction of Hub Sites?
The best feature of SharePoint hub sites is that they are simple and powerful. Once established, they allow for easy ways to better organize your intranet. As they are established, we expect that people will experience better access to content that is important to them without having to hunt for it. There are also simple visual cues that one is in the same family of sites, and easy thing to miss if not done right, and the value is confidence passed on to the user.
Being a Senior Product Manager, what are the most challenging and interesting customer implementation scenarios you have come across?
Certainly the move to the cloud adds complexity for customers who need or want to span from on-premises to online. And this can be a moment in time, or established for some time.
Once hybrid is established, the complexity barrier comes down. And then the journey is a mix of using more cloud and less dependence on on-premises. The mid-term complexity is a variance of site types in the mix of the intranet, classic publishing sites alongside modern sites. This is very possible, and sometimes poses a variance of feature set and design look and feel. But the challenge is addressable, and for many customer who are planning for a cloud-mostly, cloud-only future, this is a manageable, meaningful step.
We work in a lot of scenarios where the end users of the intranets we work on are Millennials. These projects are always interesting to work on. Do you any thoughts on how intranets can be made more engaging for Millennials?
I don’t think of it as age groups, but of new experiences some people prefer, crave or are simply used to. And this is something that drives the industry at it’ core – how can I make my product/service more engaging.
And with SharePoint, we’ve been on a user interface / user experience journey for the last two years, and have many plans in the works to continuously adjust and refine as we go. We get a lot of signals from a lot of users, of all ages, and we work to continuously refine their collective experience.
What’s your take on voice and conversational interfaces with respect to intranets? Will be seeing mainstream adoption of intranets integrated with voice assistants?
There are a lot of chat methods, some human, some not – and all are programmed and interacted with humans from the get go – so far. And per intranets, they will simply adapt and adopt them all.
We see great progress with how the Microsoft/SharePoint-based intranet interacts with chat systems like Microsoft Teams and Yammer, and of course email via Outlook. And as our customers and partners bring in bots using the Bot Framework, the service simply provides a method for placing the bot where it needs to be against the corpus of knowledge or actions it’s meant to pull from and provide to the user via chat. And these will get smarter, and humans will get more chat savvy in context with their content, and the intranet plays role as service to all – still keeping the glue that binds people between their content, information and forward-moving communications.
Intranet sites often don’t get enough love from stakeholders when it comes to user experience. What would be your advice to user experience designers working on intranets?
It’s worth it. An intranet that doesn’t engage will grow stale and unused to the degree of which the invest pays back. So, design is worth that investment – and only has been proven worthy over and over again.
Intranet adoption remains a big issue. We spend at ton of time listening to what our eventual users have to say during the conceptualisation phase to address this. What’s your advice to organizations planning intranets to help them drive and retain engagement?
That same approach, to listen, to iterate beyond initial roll out, to train users, to continuously communicate to them. You’ll never reach 100% for some obvious reasons, but you can influence more and more with each simple new feature, with each refinement based on feedback, with each executive support push. And last: content is key. If you don’t have good content (and good search and discovery to find or showcase that content dynamically), then there is no good reason to visit the most beautiful of intranets. Cherish the contributor too, and make it easy for them to contribute.
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How SharePoint is changing: Behind the scenes with Adam Harmetz, Partner GPM on SharePoint and Office 365

‘How SharePoint is changing: Behind the scenes with Adam Harmetz, Partner GPM on SharePoint and Office 365’

With the big focus on Intelligent cloud strategy, what is your vision with SharePoint on-premise implementations? what guidance you will provide to customer who continue to invest in SharePoint on-premise?
We’ve announced SharePoint Server 2019, our next on premises release, back at the last Microsoft Ignite conference. This upcoming week, we’ll share more details about the release, so stay tuned!
We are committed to supporting customers through the transition to the cloud, including a new on premises release so the cloud earns the right to be the default choice instead of it being a forced move. Our deep investment in hybrid experiences and well as migration tools from us and partners help bridge this gap.
We think a lot about how we can be a trusted partner to our customers in this generational shift to cloud computing. I think the fact that Microsoft ourselves is going through similar cultural and technological transformation gives us a lot of empathy for the disruption many of our customers are seeing and I personally try to channel that empathy into the product every day. It’s not just about a technological choice but rather an entire relationship you can have with Microsoft to help you through a critical time for your business.
Nearly half of the workforce will be millennials by 2020. Will we be seeing any changes in SharePoint in terms of functionality and user experience to address this audience?
We have radically overhauled our user experience over the past two years, designed to simplify the experience, bring it to mobile, and democratize employee engagement and business process creation. Communication Sites, which launched last year, are probably one of the biggest ways we’ve done that. Anyone in an organization can get up and running with a professional and mobile ready Communication Site in just minutes. And of course our new Hub Sites feature is dynamic from day 1 – you can rearrange the sites in a hub as many times as you want, so your intranet is as dynamic as your business.
Much of this modernization was a result of the shift in the workforce you are referencing. These digital natives want self-service experiences and often blur the boundaries between time and place in dynamic ways. SharePoint is evolving to reflect that.
At Microsoft Ignite in 2017, a large number of new SharePoint features were announced. Closer connectivity to the cloud and Office 365 Hub Sites, a brand new migration tool, improved team and communication sites, Flow and PowerApps integration and lot more. Which part of the SharePoint roadmap has you the most excited?
It’s very hard to pick one thing. SharePoint has always been a portfolio product, providing multiple discrete pillars of business value. I truly see my job as not picking one favorite thing but rather ensuring that the broad spectrum of functionality that our customers rely on SharePoint for is all brought forward and modernized.
So I’m probably most excited about the fact that all the major pillar business pillars have something to drive excitement: in Share and Work Together, we announced deep integration with Teams. In Inform and Engage Employees, we talked about the momentum with Communication Sites and announced how you can organize all sites into a intranet with Hub Sites. In Transform Business Process we talked about deeper PowerApps and Flow integration. And the list goes on.
It’s clear that Microsoft is placing a lot of emphasis on SharePoint UX. The evolution of the user experience over the years has been dramatic. Could you share how this was brought about internally by the SharePoint team?
Great question. I love talking about how all this is happening behind the scenes. I think there are a few key ingredients to our plan and a happy confluence of factors that came together over the past couple years:
It was clear in the industry and how our community was extending SharePoint themselves that we needed a new front end architecture for our UX. We wanted to embrace open standards and move our UX code to client side, decoupled from the rest of the service. In short, our engineering team was already motivated to rewrite the front end.
We over doubled the size of our Design team and recruited some of the top designers in the industry. Product people like folks on my team focused less on UX interaction and more on product framing and data-driven insights from our service.
Our feedback loop went from 3 years to 3 minutes. We no longer only shipped a boxed product once every three years, but rather are iterating rapidly and getting a wealth of qualitative and quantitative data. In short, our customers are directly responsible for helping us co-design the improved UX in a way that gets a little better every day.
Intranets have received a lot of love in the SharePoint roadmap. It’s amazing that we are going to see Communication sites, News Pages, Bing Search, Promote Button, leveraging LinkedIn with Improved people cards, News Digest, Hub sites. A lot of these seem to be based on driving up adoption. Could you share some insights on the thought process behind these new changes.
Another great question. This I think was a classic example of how to approach the modernization of a pretty successful existing product. As much as we could, we kept existing concepts and features the same, with perhaps a new UX on top of them. We already have a rich Content Management System in SharePoint so the concepts of sites, metadata, lists, libraries, web parts et cetera – these are successful models and something our community is well used to.
We often talk about how much we can keep the Information Architecture the same as we modernize the product. So I hope folks recognize a lot in the modern intranet from their existing one and what has always been in SharePoint for many years. Beyond that, though, we did look at what customers were telling us and made a few bold bets in the intranet space:
Mobile & time to develop:We made some bets that ensure intranets would be accessible on a mobile device and reduced the development time (often to zero!) for building a site. This required us to own the default UX and create something that feels like an app (which you can extend) vs. a portal platform with no turnkey experience.
News & Social:The one major new user job we added to the intranet is that we took on the burden of helping orchestrate the process by which employees will discover content. Proactively helping people find the content locked away in the intranet wasn’t really a user job anyone relied on SharePoint before, but with News and Yammer & Teams Integration, more and more you’ll see us helping people get their content noticed and shared.
Intelligence:AI is changing the world and it has true transformative power when it comes to content discovery in the enterprise. The intranet will increasingly be a place where it’s clear that AI can have a really positive impact on the employee experience.
We are seeing a lot of interest related to PowerApps from our customers. Are we going to see tighter integration with PowerApps over the long term.
Absolutely! The Power Apps web part for SharePoint recently went out to production, for instance. PowerApps is the Rapid Application Development platform from Microsoft and it’ll be tightly integrated into the content collaboration platform (i.e. SharePoint in Office 365). It’s a classic 1+1=3 opportunity.
Customers are expecting quick implementations of their SharePoint solutions. What guidance you have for developers to address customer expectations? Also what advancements you plan to bring to developer toolset in the future to ease out the pressure on developers?
We designed the SharePoint Framework as a way of addressing these time to market concerns we were hearing from the development community. My biggest advice is to learn client side development as our goal is that any front end developer should be able to extend SharePoint with SPFx, with little to no SharePoint expertise required. The community has a bunch of great classes where you can learn the latest.
What suggestions you will give to IT and business manager to achieve faster and bigger adoption of SharePoint platform
Here’s a few of the most impactful suggestions I’ve seen in various customers I’ve talked to:
Encourage self-service site creation:Empower your users to create sites (or Teams) themselves. There are plenty of governance and organizational controls on the backend to help manage the sprawl; don’t get in the way at the team forming stage.
Adopt SharePoint News:It requires a culture change to move out of email into News, but when done the impact is transformational. It’s a way more transparent culture and there is a shared history folks can refer back to. If done right, the SharePoint News feed is a perfect blend of high value information without being overwhelming, so it can be habit forming when the culture as a whole adopts it.
Get users to install the SharePoint mobile app:Educate users that they can keep up to date with News and find organizational knowledge on the go.
And finally, what are you excited to see at SharePoint NA?
Seeing the community and meeting customers. We have the best community in tech and it’s always so much fun to catch up and build a shared network. And then of course I absolutely LOVE hearing customer stories of how they are using SharePoint or the challenges they are having. I always take back so much that I can share with the team here in Redmond.
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The first rule of chatbots: Don’t lie to your users An interview with UX designer Joe Toscano

Chatbot

By Vishal Gangawane

Chatbots were all the rage in 2016 and 2017 promises to be no different. We spoke to Joe Toscano, an user experience design professional based in San Fransisco, about the current and future impact of chatbots. Toscano manages and lead experience design and prototyping for R/GA’s team embedded at Google. R/GA is a full service digital agency creating products, services and communications to help grow our client’s businesses in the connected age. He also blogs on the Invision blog and at Muzli.
Q. As a primer, could you tell us in brief about chatbots? Also, are chatbots truly the next big thing and if true what industries is this likely to disrupt?
Chatbots, for those that are unaware, are software programs created to replicate human conversation with human users.
The concept of chatbots has been around for several decades. Since the 1950s, to be exact. The beginnings can be traced back to Alan Turing, and his experiments with computer science and human intelligence. These would later form the basis for what we refer to as the Turing test.
Creating a true “chat” bot is very difficult. It requires a lot of data and a lot of iteration.
I believe chatbots as most people understand them are a trend at this moment in history. I think right now we’re going to see a lot of companies trying to own the space and create the best bot possible. And I think for that reason chatbots are going to disrupt a lot of industries.
But I think once our natural language processing systems have enough data running through them and we can speak to these bots, the bubble will pop. I think the modern chatbot manifested in a text messaging app will be around for a while, maybe 3-5 years, but I don’t think it’s the end all product that most bot makers and creative technologists are truly excited about. I think chatbots as we currently understand them are just the onboarding for the future.
Q. You have written about your best practices for building chatbots. Could you repeat them for our readers again in brief here?
1.Don’t lie to your users: I think this is important for any brand/product. But it’s especially important with chatbots. Humans are much less likely to trust a computer agent than another human. And if you blow it once, you’re probably not going to get a second or third chance.
2. Onboard with conversation: The general public isn’t used to interacting with and commanding their devices. Help them learn by initiating the conversation. Don’t create a tutorial, but ask them questions or give them commands about how to use your bot.
3. Design for human emotion: Similar to point 1, your bot is not inherently attractive to human users. We, as humans, crave human connection. It’s important that your bot meets your user as a human. But don’t try to trick your users into believing it is a human. It’s a fine line.
4. Conversation is limitless: Language is an incredible tool. It’s the closest tool we have to mind alteration. We can speak and communicate ideas from one head to the other with relatively simple ease. But teaching a computer to understand language like we do is not easy.
5. Create boundaries: We’re better off creating specific conversations and directing the flow of the conversation to keep people within the ‘loop’ we’ve created. It will not only help make sure your bot doesn’t break, but also make sure that your users are having the best experience possible.
6. Let them down easy: When your bot does fail, make sure you’ve created a plan to help keep people around. If your screen goes blank or you give them some painful error message, your users are just going to leave and probably not come back again.
7. Every interaction is meaningful: Unlike the web and apps where many interactions are required just to navigate the page, every interaction with your bot will give an output. Every interaction becomes meaningful.
8. Help users help you: You’ll never know everything your users want. That goes for any product. But bots make it easier to figure it out. All you have to do is ask. Or offer a spot for your users to submit things. Let your users shape the product by telling you what they want.
9. Identify and target user sentiment: As we’ve already recognized, human emotion is as important in bots as anywhere else on the web. Maybe more important. And it’s the first platform where we’re getting insights into human emotions through contextual conversation. We can use this to teach our bot to recognize the emotions and help create a better experience.
Q. Say five to ten years down the line, how do you envision chatbots transforming the lives of users?
Humans are very habitual creatures. Sure, not every day is exactly the same, but there are a lot of similarities across days. I believe the knowledge we get from bots will allow us to build systems that anticipate our needs and get us away from our screens. I believe eventually bots will become an extension of our self.
Right now we do this through sites and apps that automate things for us — Reminder apps to keep us on track, apps like Instacart to do our grocery shopping, apps like Uber to get us a ride from place to place.
I believe eventually we won’t have to pull our phones out of our pocket but we’ll be able to make all these things happen.
Q. In the same vein, how will the role of UX designers change in about the same period?
I believe the role of UX designer will stay relatively the same — create systems that meet your users needs in the most intuitive way. But I believe the needs of users will change, and that’s the difference.
That’s just a historical fact though. If we stayed the same, society would never move forward. I just think we’re going to start moving forward at exponential rates. I’d argue we already have in many parts of the world, but I believe it’s going to be global instead of just in pockets of the world like San Francisco, New York, South Korea, etc.
Q. Aren’t chatbots essentially a technical project? Will UX designers have a role to play beyond providing the script/dialogue of how the conversations will play out?
Similar to the last question, I believe UX designers will always have a role — understanding and empathizing with the humans using the product. I believe this will be one of the last roles to be phased out of technical projects, because human emotion is so hard to replicate in binaries.
Q. How will chatbots affect enterprise software? India’s software industry primarily caters to large enterprise clients overseas so we are extremely interested in seeing how this plays out.
I don’t have specific examples off the top of my head but any way that systems can be automated and made more efficient, an enterprise is going to love it. And I know that’s a fact.
Q. Will the emergence of chatbots mean lesser investments in building web, mobile applications by enterprises? Or will chatbots play a more complimentary role with what gets built?
I think initially you’re going to see businesses trying to build chatbots within their apps. I think it’s going to be difficult for businesses to commit to the fact that apps are going to be old news, because they’ve invested so much into their ecosystems and it won’t be easy to just toss that stuff out the window. I think that’s part of why it will take so long for bots to become the default.
But I believe eventually bots (i.e. Google Assistant, Siri, Alexa, etc.) will become the next telecom. I believe there will be a few that hold the market and people will use them based on what their algorithms produce.
Data is the new oil and building the best AI system is the new race to space.
Q. Which companies/startups/people are the ones to watch out in the chatbots arena?
In terms of complex, data driven bots used for search and information/navigating the world around us:
• Google → Google Assistant
• Amazon → Alexa
• Apple → Siri
• SoundHound → Hound
In terms of focused bots performing specific tasks that do it really well right now:
• Pana
• Hipmunk
• Duolingo
• Penny
Q. What are likely to be the hurdles and roadblocks before we see mainstream adoption of chatbots?
I believe the biggest hurdle will be user adoption and I believe the biggest roadblock to that will be making sure bots do not turn into spam messaging bots, because bots already have a stigma of being spam and if we want people to adopt these systems, we’re going to need to turn that around.
Also, privacy. Making sure people know what their data is being used for and how they can control where their data is going.
This is a very important chapter in my book, actually.
Q. And finally, is the hype true? Will chatbots kill apps?
Yes, I believe the hype is true. I think it’s still going to take 2-3 years before we have a revolutionary breakthrough that makes these technologies accessible to everyone, and I believe it will take 3-5 before bots become adopted by the mainstream, but I believe automated systems that are backed by artificial intelligence and are interacted with through voice/text will kill off apps eventually.
If you want to know more about chatbots, Toscano in the process of writing a book that explains all these points and much more. It is likely to be done by mid-February 2017. You can sign up to join over 700 people that are already on the waitlist here: http://bit.ly/2eELh9W
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For intranet projects, search for ways to include unexpected delight for users

BY Prafull Mane

Jennifer Aldrich is a UX & Content Strategist at InVision, the popular prototyping, collaboration, and workflow platform. Aldrich’s interests are varied and include content strategy, design thinking, user centered design, writing, defining product voice and tone, usability testing and user research. She firmly believes that sharing knowledge is one of the most powerful ways that members of the UX community can make an impact on the world around them.
Aldrich spoke to Spadeworx about her UX prep, user research, convincing stakeholders to invest in the UX process, design thinking and how the path to being a UX professional can often be circuitous.
Q. How do you approach a project? What is your preparation process you follow before starting any project?
I honestly consider prep work part of my process. Including prep in your design time estimates and allotments will save you frustration and headaches down the line. Research is a huge first step. Chat with your target audience and deep dive to find out not just what they want, but what the underlying problems are that they’re trying to solve. If you’re creating a brand new product, don’t get hung up on what competitors offer, focus on what clients actually need. Often times competitors, especially those that have been around for a long time, get bogged down by legacy features that aren’t even useful anymore. You don’t want to do a competitive analysis and wind up working on features that are already useless. Focusing on specific problems that aren’t being addressed well currently can make your product lighter weight, easier to use and position you as a real contender in your space.
Q. It’s often hard to convince stakeholders to invest in the UX process. How do you make them see the value of good UX?
The key to getting a company to invest in the UX process if you’re working in-house or at an agency, is finding a high ranking internal sponsor. Bobby Meeks just did a great webinar with Designer Hangout that focused a lot on the topic. Don’t try to change the entire organization yourself, find a person at the top who will help advocate and evangelize the concept company wide. Once you have that buy in, other stakeholders tend to jump on board. When working with individual clients, sell the financial value. Explain that spending some time doing some user research and usability testing can save them huge amounts of money that would otherwise go to redesign. Saving cash is a big motivator for stakeholders and clients.
Q. Intranet sites often don’t get enough love when it comes to user experience. How can we make intranet sites more interesting and not just something that employees use just because they no option?
Getting a high ranking team member to sponsor it as a way to improve work culture can really help. As far as how to make them more interesting, treat them the way you would your product. Do some user research to figure out where pain points are, improve the UX, search for ways to include unexpected delight, focus on adding some content that would be interesting to internal staff members (perhaps a series of interviews about team members) etc.
Q. In terms of the UX process, how can applying the Pareto principle be useful?
Absolutely. Applying the Pareto Principle to your user research strategy can be especially beneficial. I’ve outlined a method that I used at my last startup here: https://uxmag.com/articles/pareto-principle-based-user-research
Q. What are your ways of finding pain points in any product?
To find pain points there are really 3 main discovery tools. The first is conducting user research. Get out and talk to your clients, walk them through various scenarios, ask them direct what is causing them the most pain. Next is reviewing support cases. Chatting with your support team, and analyzing case data can help you quickly identify areas of the product that need to be improved most. Thirdly, trying to use the product yourself on a daily basis can be extremely helpful in IDing major product issues. Even if the tool isn’t something that would be traditionally related to your role, learning to use it, and attempting to use it at least once a day to finish a primary task can be very eye opening. It’s one thing to hear about other people experiencing an issue, it’s another thing entirely to actually experience it yourself. It’s a very powerful motivator.
Q. Design Thinking is getting a lot of attention in recent times. Could you tell us your views on how it can be applied to various problems?
Design thinking is creating a cultural shift across organizations. In the past, design teams were siloed off within organizations. Companies are now realizing that the skills that designers use to think through and solve problems can be applied cross functionally, and as a result design has made its way to C level roles in businesses all over the world. Designers are being called on to apply their skillets to all kinds of business problems.
Q. Any tips for UX designers on how they can start thinking about sustainability more and bringing that more into their work?
Sustainability is so, so important. I’ll never forget the first time I watched Objectified. The scene that showed mountains of old tech in a landfill was burned into my mind and has stuck with me ever since. There are several areas that we tend to overlook, not intentionally, they just aren’t front of mind, in design. Focusing on sustainability is one, as is accessibility. As far as bringing it into our work, it really just requires a shift in thinking. If someone needs some convincing about designing with sustainability in mind, I’d definitely recommend having them watch the landfill scene from objectified. It’s pretty haunting.
Q. Could you tell us about how you made your way into User Experience? You have a science and psychology degree. How did that guide your work?
I took a circuitous route into the UX industry. I built my first website in the 90s and had a blast doing it. At that point it didn’t occur to me that design was something I could turn into a career, so I wound up heading to college and getting a degree in education and another in psychology. While I was finishing up my second degree, I took on a part-time job as a computer lab tech. I got to witness first hand the impact that well executed software has on the workflows and levels of productivity of members of various industries. I also got to witness the impact of poorly designed software—the loss of time and energy and high levels of frustration that it could inflict. After graduation, I wound up taking a job at a startup as a software trainer, but was eventually loaned out to the design and development department during a product overhaul project (rebuilding our entire platform on .NET). That was when I truly fell in love with product design. I was offered a job on the UX team soon after the project was completed, and had amazing mentors that helped me grow and launch my career. Pulling from a background in psychology has definitely impacted the way I perform user research and usability testing. I find the entire process and the results fascinating.
Q. We are huge InVision fans and very curious about how things work there. Could you tell us about the design process at InVision and the culture in general?
The culture here at InVision is phenomenal. We have clearer lines of communication than I’ve ever experienced in a traditional office setting and a very positive overall culture. There is much respect across teams, the leadership team is phenomenal and teams work together beautifully cross departmentally. We even have a peer recognition program that gets used very heavily each month. The employees at InVision are just fantastic.
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